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Sponsored by: The Autism Site

In 2015, America was outraged as the cost of a little-known drug called Daraprim skyrocketed overnight from $13.50 to $750 a pill. In 2016, the ubiquitous allergy medicine Epi-Pen rose from $100 to $600 in an instant.

Why? Profit.

These scandals are just two examples of a pervasive problem with American healthcare, which allows pharmaceutical companies to set prices as they see fit with a patchwork system of insurance providers. There are no restrictions of profit margins. There is little transparency in the pricing process. The result? Americans pay more for prescription drugs than any other nation in the world.

In most European countries, single-payer health systems use their size to negotiate big discounts, but the United States does not have a similar program and Obamacare did nothing to rein in the costs of prescription drugs when it was passed.

Clearly, something needs to change. When the price of lifesaving drugs suddenly goes from affordable to exorbitant, people deserve to understand why. When the VA is allowed to negotiate directly with drug companies, but Medicare is not, Medicare ends up with a deal that's better for the pharmaceutical companies than the people Medicare serves.

Two changes to current American policy would go a long way to ensuring pharmaceutical companies don't exploit the sick:

  1. Require drug-makers to justify the costs of their treatments and disclose major price hikes.
  2. Repeal the noninterference clause of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 which prevents Medicare, the single largest payer for health care in the U.S., from negotiating directly with drug companies.

Tell the Department of Health and Human Services enact the above legislation which would be a good start to controlling out-of-control drug prices in the United States. The American public shouldn't be expected to pad the pocketbooks of wealthy pharmaceutical executives! Lives are on the line.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of Health and Human Services,

I am writing to you to express my concern for the growing cost of prescription drugs in the United States. Pharmaceutical companies are taking advantage of ordinary, sick Americans, and it's up to you to do something about it.

Over the past few years, from Daraprim to EpiPen, we have seen a series of scandals emerge as pharmaceutical companies increase the prices of old drugs in an attempt to increase profits year after year. Since the United States has no single-payer healthcare system, this means the American public is being asked to shoulder the burden of these companies limitless greed at the cost of their health and financial stability.

Clearly, something needs to change. When the price of lifesaving drugs suddenly goes from affordable to exorbitant, people deserve to understand why. When the VA is allowed to negotiate directly with drug companies, but Medicare is not, Medicare ends up with a deal that's better for the pharmaceutical companies than the people Medicare serves.

Two changes to current American policy would go a long way to ensuring pharmaceutical companies don't exploit the sick:

  1. Require drug-makers to justify the costs of their treatments and disclose major price hikes.
  2. Repeal the noninterference clause of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 which prevents Medicare, the single largest payer for health care in the U.S., from negotiating directly with drug companies.

Please, enact the above policies which would be a good start to controlling out-of-control drug prices in the United States. The American public shouldn't be expected to pad the pocketbooks of wealthy pharmaceutical executives.

Petition Signatures


May 29, 2018 Pilar Pérez
May 22, 2018 Aliyah Khan
May 5, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 29, 2018 Barb Quinn
Apr 24, 2018 Denise Griffin
Apr 24, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 12, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 7, 2018 Lisa vasta
Mar 20, 2018 Burdsall Angela Without antidepressants, I will kill myself.
Mar 12, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 10, 2018 Carol Maindonald
Mar 10, 2018 Edward Hughes
Mar 9, 2018 Mary Bissell
Mar 8, 2018 Inessa Shakhnazarian
Mar 8, 2018 Ashia Castendyk
Mar 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 6, 2018 María Florencia Martínez
Mar 5, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 4, 2018 María Jesús Escobedo Barrera
Mar 4, 2018 Eva Avrampou
Mar 4, 2018 James Sorrells
Mar 3, 2018 Sonya Grant
Mar 3, 2018 Sara Bakker
Mar 3, 2018 Fernanda Magri
Mar 2, 2018 Tammy Gardner
Mar 2, 2018 Kayleigh Brown
Mar 1, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 1, 2018 Mary Clausing
Mar 1, 2018 Tenaya Egbert
Mar 1, 2018 Wanda Huelsman
Mar 1, 2018 Lisa Sons
Mar 1, 2018 Lynn Brown
Mar 1, 2018 Carla Wilson
Mar 1, 2018 Magdalini M.
Mar 1, 2018 Lynda Eggleston
Mar 1, 2018 Kim Zwicker
Mar 1, 2018 Sara Rathfon
Mar 1, 2018 Cassandra Ward There should be a maximum percentage for profit. Only allow these companies to make so much of a profit and to charge a fair amount over the actual cost.
Mar 1, 2018 Charles Muehlhof
Mar 1, 2018 Dawn Ramsey
Mar 1, 2018 Heinz-Helmut Umbreit
Mar 1, 2018 Candace Slivinski
Mar 1, 2018 Heather McKenzie-York
Mar 1, 2018 kyriaki paschali
Mar 1, 2018 Carla Compton
Feb 28, 2018 Yvette Joubert
Feb 28, 2018 Zoe Spiropoulou
Feb 28, 2018 Daniela Rossi
Feb 28, 2018 Victoria Baylova

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